DeLaSalle’s Office of Student Services is responsible for curriculum design, course schedules and academic files of all students as well as the transcripts of graduates.

Curriculum Guide

The 2015-16 Curriculum Guide is available below. Click on the bold heading to access that section of the curriculum guide.

General Information

DeLaSalle is a Catholic high school that seeks to create a community of students from various economic levels, academic abilities, racial communities, and ethnic backgrounds.  In the Lasallian tradition of St. John Baptist de La Salle, the school strives to facilitate personal academic success, but also to prepare students to be of service to society.Within the larger tradition of the Catholic Church, DeLaSalle regards spiritual development as a primary educational goal.  All students are required to take Theology courses and attend school worship services.Admission to Grade 9 is based on assessment of the following:

  • Completion of application forms,
  • A grade school teacher recommendation regarding academic potential and personal character,
  • Entrance exam scores, and
  • Middle school transcripts

Admission may be unconditional, or probationary—in which case additional conditions may need to be met before entering ninth grade.Students transferring to Grade 10, 11, or 12 must:

  • Provide a high school transcript,
  • Provide a letter from a counselor or teacher attesting to academic potential and personal character,
  • Interview with the Director of Admission and/or Principal,
  • If foreign-born, demonstrate competence in English.

Transfer students are accepted at the start of a quarter/semester, except for special circumstances.  To receive a DeLaSalle diploma, Grade 12 transfer students must normally be enrolled for the entire year.

Ninth graders entering DeLaSalle will be introduced to the personal academic and social worlds that come with being a 21st century digital citizen.

  • All ninth graders must pass coursework in Foundations and Ethics in Technology, which will meet at designated times within the school year. This course will take each student through the necessary tools and protocols needed to navigate the academic use of the iPad and other technologies used during their tenure at DeLaSalle. Students will be introduced to the responsibilities, ethics, safeguards needed for social media, and the etiquette required as their digital presence matures and grows.  Many topics will be integrated into the core ninth grade curriculum as a further application of concepts including: internet safety, cyber bullying, the digital footprint and digital ethics.

For all students, common requirements in sequence:

  • A full year of English is required in Grades 9-10-11-12.
  • A full year of Theology is required in Grades 9-10-11-12.
    • Theology requirements for Grade 11 and 12 include one required semester course plus a choice of one semester elective.
    • Transfers must earn one Theology credit for each semester of attendance.
  • Three years of Mathematics are required.
  • Christian Service is introduced in Grade 9 and must be completed by the end of the first semester of Grade 12.
  • A full year of a Physical Sciences course and a full year of a Biological/Life Sciences course each are required.
  • One year of Fine Arts is required and may be taken in any grade.
  • One semester of Physical Education is required in Grade 9.
    • One semester credit in Health is required in Grade 10, 11, or 12.
    • One semester credit in Physical Education:Wellness is required in Grade 10, 11 or 12, and may be fulfilled either as a course or by verified participation in a DeLaSalle athletic program.
  • One semester of Social Studies in Grade 9 (World History), plus three full years in Grade 10 (Modern World History and Geography), Grade 11 (U.S. History or AP U.S. History), and Grade 12 (one semester of which must be U.S. Government or AP U.S. Government) are required.
    • Students in the classes of 2017, 2018 and 2019 are required to take three years of Science.
    • Students in the classes of 2017, 2018 and 2019 are required to take two years of a single Modern Language.

  1. All students must register for at least six credits each semester.  Seven courses may be taken, or six courses and one non-credit study hall.
  2. A $350.00 non-refundable registration deposit is due with the registration form.
  3. Courses may be canceled due to insufficient number of students registered or changes in personnel. A student’s alternative course selections will be used in the case of a course cancellation. NOTE: Preference for alternate course selections will be granted to upperclass students who registered in advance of all deadines.
  4. Course Drop/Add Policies: Students are advised to choose courses wisely. The master schedule and instructional personnel are set to accommodate those courses chosen in the spring of the year. If a parent or a student requests a schedule change, it will be governed by the following policies.  Students who do not adhere to these policies will not receive credit for classes.
    1. Once a semester has begun, both the parents and teachers involved must give written approval for a schedule change on a Drop/Add Form, which is available in the Student Services Office.
    2. If a class is already filled, a request to add that class will not be honored. DeLaSalle is committed to keeping class sizes small and balanced and will not accommodate a change if it means overloading a class. (Note: This may also involve other classes affected by the change).
    3. A $25.00 processing fee is assessed whenever a course is dropped. This must be paid before the change is processed.
    4. Students must follow their current schedule until they receive a new schedule.
    5. Schedule changes will not be made to accommodate requests for specific teachers or for lunch hour.
    6. A senior who wishes to be a Teacher Aide and receive credit for the course must complete the Teacher Aide form — with all appropriate signatures — and return it to Student Services during the first week of the semester. Students may not be a Teacher Aide and also have a study hall during the same semester.
    7. Courses dropped during the first two weeks of a semester will not appear on a student’s transcript. Any course dropped from 3 – 6 weeks will appear as a W (withdrawn) on their transcript.  Any dropped after the 6 week period will appear as a WF (withdrawn fail) or a WP (withdrawn pass) on their transcript, but the WF or WP is not calculated in the student’s GPA.

Requirements for a DeLaSalle Diploma include:

  • 4 years of Theology
  • 4 years of English
  • 3.5 years of Social Studies
  • 3 years of Mathematics
  • 3 years of Science (2 years required for class of 2016)
  • 2 years of a single Modern Language (no requirements for class of 2016)
  • 1 year of Fine Arts
  • 1 semester credit in Health is required in Grade 10, 11, or 12
  • 1 semester credit in Physical Education:Wellness is required in Grade 10, 11 or 12, and may be fulfilled either as a course or by verified participation in a DeLaSalle athletic program
  • 1 semester credit of Physical Education 9
  • Passing the Christian Service requirement
  • Passing the required course in Foundations and Ethics in Technology
  • 45 minimum semester credits are required for graduation.

  • Advanced Placement (AP) credit is available via coursework and testing in Biology, Calculus BC, Chemistry, English Language and Composition, English Literature and Composition, European History, Government, Physics, Psychology (testing only), Spanish, Studio Art, and United States History.Any student who wishes to prepare for the AP Test in an area not listed here should see a teacher and counselor early in the year for advice on how to accomplish this goal. Students who take AP classes are required to take the AP test in May.
  • PACC credits (College Credit through St. Mary’s University of Minnesota) in AP Biology and AP Literature and Composition (English 12) are available for a modest tuition fee to to St. Mary’s University. A list of colleges and universities accepting PACC credits is available in the Student Services Office.
  • GLOBAL ADVANTAGE PROGRAM (1 credit)Global Advantage college credits are available through Hamline University, St Mary’s University of Minnesota or the University of Minnesota upon completion of a class/travel summer session at DeLaSalle and payment of a fee. Global Advantage Program academic courses combine rigorous academic components with short term travel to international destinations chosen to compliment the areas of study. Courses are typically designed through collaboration between DeLaSalle faculty and university professors allowing students to earn college credits for many of the courses. Academics will often combine subject matters – e.g. Art and Science, History and Literature – with preparation of students under the motto “preparation and participation, curiosity and civility”. Additionally, students may apply for longer term exchange opportunities in Argentina, Germany, Italy and Costa Rica. The experiences will last four to eight weeks and students will attend a partner high school while living with a host family. Students may earn DeLaSalle credit for exchange opportunity.

Admissions policies among the many colleges and universities vary greatly.  It is advisable that students check with all colleges of interest for specific requirements.  DeLaSalle High School provides course curriculum to meet college preparatory standards.  In general, for a four-year college, a student will need 4 years of English, 3-4 years of Mathematics, 3-4 years of Science (3 years of a Lab Science), 3 years of Social Studies and a minimum of 2 years in the same Modern Language.Students interested in highly selective colleges should take the most advanced courses available; the level of “academic rigor” is important to selective colleges.  Students should work closely with admissions counselors at the college or university to which they are applying.
If you are considering a college for:Recommendations of courses to take in high school:
Liberal Arts2-4 years of the same Modern Language
Engineering4 years of Mathematics plus Chemistry and Physics
Business4 years of Mathematics
Health Careers3-4 years of Mathematics plus Chemistry and either AP Physics, AP Biology, or AP Chemistry
College admissions counselors will consider the following academic criteria when making admissions decisions:

  • Course choices by the student
  • Grade Point Average
  • ACT and/or SAT Test scores

To be eligible to practice and compete in intercollegiate athletics at an NCAA Division 1 or Division 2 institution during the first year in college, students must have maintained a satisfactory high school grade point average in NCAA approved core courses for DeLaSalle High School and have received a satisfactory score on a standardized college entrance examination.  Students and parents may log on to the NCAA website (www.ncaaclearinghouse.net) for more information.

Subject Areas

Students will be introduced to the idea that literatures help us understand the complexity of the world and our place in it.  Moreover, students will learn that literatures are conduits to diverse human perspectives, experiences, and institutions.  This will be accomplished through the introduction and development of rhetorical and literary techniques and vocabulary in all English courses.  The goal of the English department is to produce students who are critical thinkers, speakers, writers, and readers.

  • ENGLISH 9 (2 semesters)English 9 introduces students to foundational skills in speaking, writing, and reading.  This focus will be accomplished through reading and analyzing stories from a variety of genres and also through written exercises and assignments.  Instruction will focus on grammar, mechanics, effective use of technology, and critical reading and writing.
  • ENGLISH 10 (2 semesters)The focus of English 10 will be language, communication and media. Students will be introduced to media literacy, formal speaking and communication techniques, and will be provided with a more developed understanding of how the English language works and creates meaning. Students will read and analyze a variety of genres that will prepare them for reading canonical literatures in English 11 and English 12.
  • ENGLISH 11 (2 semesters)This college preparatory course stresses literature and writing with the emphasis placed on American literature and expository writing (the essay and other non-fiction forms of opinion writing).  A review of grammar and mechanics, the sentence, and the paragraph occurs as needed.  A formal research paper and a preliminary college application essay are written.
  • ENGLISH 12 (2 semesters)English 12 is a college preparatory course that stresses literature and writing with the emphasis placed on world literature, the essay, and creative writing (poetry, drama, and short story).  A review of grammar and mechanics, the sentence, and the paragraph occurs as needed.  A formal research paper and a college application essay are written.

ENGLISH HONORS PROGRAM

  • HONORS ENGLISH 9 (2 semesters)Honors English 9 will cover the same material as English 9, but the pace will be accelerated, and there will be more reading and writing assignments.  A research paper and the format of a research paper are introduced.  Individual and group projects will be utilized to help students develop as independent thinkers and learners.  To continue in the Honors program, a student must maintain a semester grade of B or better.Prerequisite:  Although this course is self-selected, it is highly recommended that students score 75 percent or higher on the Verbal Ability, Reading, and Language sections of the DeLaSalle Entrance Exam (or show high achievement on comparable national exams).  Students who enroll in this course should be intellectually curious and prepared for its rigor.  Summer reading is required.
  • HONORS ENGLISH 10 (2 semesters)Honors English 10 will cover the same material as English 10, but the pace will be accelerated, more challenging, and there will be more writing assignments.  Also included will be units on etymology, literary allusions, and research assignments.Prerequisites: An “A” in English 9 or a “B” or above in Honors English 9 and a teacher recommendation.  The recommendation will take into consideration test scores, work ethic, consistency of performance, and intellectual curiosity.  Summer reading will be assigned.
  • LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION: AP ENGLISH 11 (2 semesters)Qualified students are invited to begin college-level English early with this course. They will develop higher-level thinking and writing skills through rhetorical analysis, reading response journals, narrative, expository, analytical and argumentative essays. They will learn to analyze and evaluate all forms of writing and articulate criticism in mature discussion and effective writing. Students are encouraged to develop a personal style.  College credit is available through the Program for Advanced College Credit (PACC) at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota, and the College Board’s Advanced Placement Examination.Prerequisites: A grade of “A” in English 10 or a grade of “B” or above in Honors English 10 and a teacher recommendation.  The recommendation will take into consideration test scores, work ethic, consistency of performance, and intellectual curiosity.  Summer reading will be assigned.
  • LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION: AP ENGLISH 12 (2 semesters)A continuation of AP Language and Composition, this course concentrates on developing skills of literary interpretation and sophisticated writing, using a variety of types and styles of literature (poetry, essays, fiction, drama), and concentrating the writing assignments on themes explored in the readings.  College credit is available through the PACC program and AP Exam.Prerequisites:  A grade of “A” in English 11 or a grade of “B” or above in AP English 11 and a teacher recommendation.  The recommendation will take into consideration test scores, work ethic, consistency of performance and intellectual curiosity.  Summer reading will be assigned.

ENGLISH ELECTIVE

  • CREATIVE WRITING (1 semester)Student writers will experiment with various forms of creative writing.  Each student will keep a writing file and works will be continually “in process.”  Students will publish a literary handout and some works will be submitted for outside consideration.Open to 10th, 11th and 12th grade students.

The Fine Arts Department includes courses in both Art and Music. Honors Art and AP Studio Art are offered to students who plan on an art career or have high ability in art.Music is seen as a means of expressing oneself either through vocal or instrumental means. The goal is to develop both skills and appreciation, working with others and performing.  The performance component includes concerts and, often, a music tour.

  • INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL ARTS (2 semesters)This course will introduce the elements of art and principles of design to help students become acquainted with different techniques and mediums. Art history from the past to present will be presented by learning about different artists and the skills used to create their work. Student assignments will encompass a variety of media including drawing, painting, sculpture, design, and photography.
  • THE ART EXPERIENCE (1 semester)The Art Experience is an introductory visual art course designed for 11th and 12th grade students.  This class will be a general overview of two-dimensional techniques in visual art and will highlight a variety of artistic techniques, styles, media, artists and contexts.  During this course, students will explore drawing, painting, design, photography, and become comfortable discussing and analyzing historical, contemporary and personal artwork.Open to 11th and 12th grade students who have not previously taken a studio art class.
  • DRAWING (1 semester)Designed for the student who likes to draw or who wants to learn to draw, this course offers experiences to help students build on their skills and techniques. Students will use a variety of drawing media including pencil, charcoal, pastels, ink, and colored pencils. Assignments will include drawing objects from nature, faces and figures, photos, still life and the imagination. This course offers variety and involvement. Materials are provided.Open to 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students.Prerequisites: Intro to Visual Arts or The Art Experience and department approval.
  • PAINTING (1 semester)Designed for students who want to learn to express themselves with paint on paper, canvas and other supports, they will work primarily with acrylic paint and watercolor. Students will learn about color theory and mixing color. Students will be able to explore different techniques and learn about the fine art of painting.Open to 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students.Prerequisites: Introduction to Visual Arts and department approval.
  • GRAPHIC DESIGN I (1 semester)Graphic Design I is an introduction to the world of graphic art and design through the use of computer software and hardcopy production.  Graphic elements and design principles will be emphasized as students use problem-solving skills to plan, design and execute a variety of graphic design projects.  Projects may include, but are not limited to: logo design, school posters, descriptive lettering, business cards, cartooning, and a graphic arts presentation.Open to 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students.
  • GRAPHIC DESIGN II (1 semester)Using Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign, students who have demonstrated talent in Graphic Design I will develop their skills with attention to design elements, professional layout and artistic expression. Course projects will require creativity, imagination, effort and attention to detail. Projects may include, but are not limited to: themed series, branding, web page design, marketing campaign, and artistic drawing.Open to 11th and 12th grade students.Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and department approval.
  • PHOTOGRAPHY I (1 semester)Students will learn the basic principles of creating and composing a strong photograph, photography career options, the manipulation of digital photography with Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Bridge, and the practical application of digital photography as an art form. Students will be required to take many photographs of people, landscapes, objects and activities. The school provides digital cameras for student use during this course.Open to 10th, 11th and 12th grade students.
  • PHOTOGRAPHY II (1 semester)Photography II is an extension of Photography I.  Students will review manual camera settings before exploring topics more in depth and developing their own artistic style.  Students will investigate historical photographers and a range of photographic genres, and  will have the opportunity to select a topic of interest for a more individualized instruction and portfolio development.  Photography II students should expect to help cover school events and address photographic needs of real clients.Open to 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students.Prerequisite:  Photography I
  • INTRODUCTION TO BROADCAST JOURNALISM (1 semester)This hands-on course is designed for students who have an interest in broadcast journalism.  The mission is to create a daily video production of news announcements from The Source that airs throughout DeLaSalle and the internet.  Students will learn technical and non-technical skills including script writing, directing, and hands-on camera and studio skills such as lighting, sound and editing.  Students will learn each element of a news story – the creative process of generating story ideas; the fieldwork of capturing audio and video footage, conducting interviews and gathering facts; and the production of work through writing a script, editing the story and anchoring the broadcast. Students will tour local broadcast facilities and meet with industry professionals.  Class projects will include news-oriented material and creative assignments.Open to 10th, 11th and 12th grade students
  • YEARBOOK DESIGN (1-2 semesters)Students will be introduced to publication production concepts, skills equipment and principles. This course will cover all aspects of planning and producing a yearbook. Topics will include theme development, writing copy and captions, headlines, page layout, page design, graphic design, photography, marketing, management and teamwork. This course will be using Adobe Photoshop, Bridge, and InDesign software. Strong computer skills and interest required.Open to 10th, 11th and 12th grade students.Suggested Prerequisites: Photography I, Graphic Design I, or Introduction to Visual Arts
  • HONORS ART (2 semesters)A course for students who plan an art career or have a high interest or ability in art. Students will work on improving their skills in the fine arts such as painting, drawing and three-dimensional sculpture and will pursue different crafts from multiple cultures.Open to 11th and 12th grade students.Prerequisites: Introduction to Visual Arts and Drawing and/or Painting, and department approval.
  • AP STUDIO ART (2 semesters)This advanced-level course offers students the opportunity to work on a portfolio in preparation for post-graduate work.  Each student will have the opportunity to submit this portfolio to the College Board for AP Studio Art and possibly earn college credit.  Students will focus on a variety of independent projects giving them the freedom to pursue, with guidance, contexts, themes, subjects and techniques that will help them advance to a higher level of artistic expression.  The course will culminate with a senior exhibit.Open to 12th grade students.Prerequisites: Introduction to Visual Arts, Drawing and/or Painting, Honors Art and departmental approval.
  • BEGINNING BAND (2 semesters)Beginning Band is designed for the student with little or no instrumental experience.  Percussion, brass, woodwind, guitar, and bass are offered.  Some instruments can be rented through the school for a small cost.
  • CONCERT BAND (2 semesters)This ensemble is intended for the student who is proficient on an instrument.  Emphasis is given in tone production, scales, rhythm, breathing and technique.  The concert band performs regularly throughout the year, alone and in conjunction with the Symphonic Band.Prerequisites: Two years experience playing the instrument and department approval.
  • SYMPHONIC BAND (2 semesters)The Symphonic Band is designed for students with an advanced  understanding of their instruments.  Music is performed from a wide variety of styles and there are opportunities to play in small ensembles.  Concerts are performed periodically throughout the year, often culminating in a tour in the spring.Open to 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students, with department approval.
  • CHAMBER ORCHESTRA (2 semesters)This select performing orchestra consists essentially of strings and woodwinds. The repertoire of this orchestra is primarily orchestral literature.  The orchestra performs on its own as well as in conjunction with the Symphonic Band and the A Cappella Choir. Students will work towards developing advanced instrumental skills, blending with the orchestra, developing appreciation for music, and gaining the ability to understand advanced musical terminology.  Because of the small size of this group, these students have unique opportunities to be heard in an intimate setting.Prerequisites: An audition and department approval.
  • BEL CANTO CHOIR (2 semesters)This course is designed for all ninth grade students to introduce and develop basic singing techniques, sight-reading skills and basic music theory concepts.  This group performs at the Christmas and Spring concerts, various liturgies, and activities through the year.  Attendance is required at all performances.
  • A CAPPELLA CHOIR (2 semesters)The A Cappella Choir is an advanced, select group that performs music from a wide variety of styles and offers opportunities to sing in small ensembles and solos.  Concerts are performed periodically throughout the year, often culminating in a tour in the spring with the Symphonic Band and/or Chamber Orchestra.Prerequisites: An audition and department approval.

Students at DeLaSalle are encouraged to take four years of mathematics, although three years are required for graduation. Most colleges and universities require the successful completion of Algebra II for admission.Students entering Grade 9 are placed in Algebra I, Advanced Algebra I or into the Honors Program. Placement in mathematics is based on scores from the Math Placement Exam as well as a departmental review of standardized test scores and middle school records. For Grades 10, 11, and 12, placement is based upon teacher recommendation and student and parent input.Here are a typical and suggested sequences of courses:Algebra I or Advanced Algebra I α Geometry αAlgebra II α PrecalculusHonors Algebra II α Honors Geometry or Geometry α Honors Precalculus or Precalculus α AP Calculus AB or Calculus α AP Calculus BC

  • ALGEBRA I (2 semesters)Students will study solving and graphing linear equations, inequalities, and systems. Students will then progress to topics that include: exponents and exponential functions, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations and functions, radicals and geometry connections, rational equations and functions, and probability and data analysis. Algebra will be used to model real-life problems and involve the use of classroom graphing calculators.
  • ADVANCED ALGEBRA I (2 semesters)Students will review solving and graphing linear equations, inequalities, and systems. Students will then study topics that include: exponents and exponential functions, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations and functions, radicals and geometry connections, rational equations and functions, and probability and data analysis. Additional topics as time allows may include: matrices and linear programming, discrete mathematics, and logic and proof. Algebra will be used to model real-life problems and involve the use of classroom graphing calculators.Prerequisite: Algebra of linear functions. Enrollment will be determined by the mathematics placement exam.
  • GEOMETRY (2 semesters)The students will learn to write informal geometric proofs using definitions, postulates, and theorems.  They will study geometric figures including triangles, quadrilaterals, other polygons, and circles.  The students will also study parallel and perpendicular lines, transformations of the plane, the Pythagorean Theorem, and the formulas for the area and volume.  Some non-Euclidean geometry will be presented.Prerequisites: Algebra I and department approval.
  • INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA (2 semesters)Intermediate Algebra will strengthen and expand student understanding of fundamental concepts from Algebra, serving as a bridge between Algebra and Algebra 2.  Students will study a variety of basic mathematical functions from the three perspectives of equations, tables of values and graphs. This course will also enhance the student’s experience and familiarity with variable and multivariable expressions and equations.  The development of problem solving skills will be emphasized.  Basic statistics and personal finance will be among the areas from which examples are drawn. Students will work on practice questions to help prepare for the ACT and SAT tests.Prerequisites:  Algebra I and department approval.
  • ALGEBRA II (2 semesters)Algebra II is recommended for any student planning to enter college or technical school.  Students will study these different functions: linear, exponential, logarithmic, quadratic, radical and trigonometric.  Students will also study systems of equations, polynomials, sequences and series, and right triangle trigonometry.Prerequisites: An average of C or better in Algebra I and department approval.
  • PRECALCULUS (2 semesters)This elective course is necessary for any student planning to enter a college program in mathematics, science, or computer science. It is recommended, however, as part of any college preparatory program and serves as a prerequisite to Calculus. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the fundamental concepts of algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. Algebra and trigonometry will be used to model real-life problems and the course material will foreshadow important ideas of Calculus. Students study the following major groups of functions and graphs: polynomial, power, rational, exponential, logistic, logarithmic, and trigonometric. They will also study analytic trigonometry and vectors. Additional topics, as time allows, may include systems and matrices, conic sections, discrete mathematics, and an introduction to Calculus.Prerequisites: An average of C or better in Algebra II and department approval.
  • CALCULUS (2 semesters)The Calculus student will survey the topics of first semester college calculus: limits, continuity, differentiation and integrals.  Elementary functions, trigonometric functions and transcendental functions will be used in applications of each topic.Prerequisites: An average of C or better in Precalculus and department approval. 

MATHEMATICS ELECTIVESElective courses may be taken by 10th, 11th & 12th grade students. Electives do not fulfill any portion of tthe three year requirement for graduation. 

  • INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS (1 semester)Students will learn how to organize, interpret and display numerical data.  Data will be analyzed using statistical tools such as the normal distribution and measures of center and spread.  Students will look at how data is gathered from surveys and experimental and observational studies.  Students will be introduced to probability theory as it relates to statistics, and will expand their study of probability models. The students will demonstrate and interpret sampling distribution models by simulations.  They will explore confidence intervals and the relationship with hypotheses testing.  Students will see the application of the statistical inferences from estimating population parameters and various hypotheses testing.Prerequisites: the successful completion of Algebra II or Honors Algebra II and department approval.
  • INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING WITH PYTHON (1 semester)This course is an introduction to computer programming using the Python programming language. This course covers basic programming concepts such as variable types, data tyoes, iteration, flow of control, input/output, and functions. We will look at various general programming ideas, such as algorithms design, modularity, and debugging. 

HONORS MATHEMATICS PROGRAM

  • HONORS ALGEBRA II (2 semesters)The Honors Algebra II student will study the topics of Algebra II and trigonometry in addition to more modern strands of mathematics.  Such topics include sequences and series, data analysis, functions, parametric equations, exponentials and logarithms, discrete math topics, systems of equations, polynomials, probability and statistics, relations, and trigonometric functions.  The content of the course is anchored in real world contexts and the use of the graphing calculator is integral to the course. More material will be covered and in greater depth than in the regular Algebra II course.  A graphing calculator is required.Prerequisites: For current DeLaSalle students: successful completion of previous math class with at least a B average and department approval. Entering ninth graders must demonstrate proficiency on the mathematics placement exam given by DeLaSalle High School.
  • HONORS GEOMETRY (2 semesters)The Honors Geometry student will study, in greater depth, the topics of a regular Geometry course. There will be greater emphasis on deductive reasoning and on proof in developing theorems. Students will be introduced to at least one non-Euclidean geometry in this class.Prerequisites: An average of C better in Honors Algebra II and department approval.
  • HONORS PRECALCULUS (2 semesters)The Honors Precalculus student will study the topics of precalculus. The range of functions covered will be broader and topics will be studied in more detail.  A graphing calculator is required.Prerequisites: An average of C or better in Honors Algebra II, and Honors Geometry and department approval.
  • AP CALCULUS AB (2 semesters)The Advanced Placement Calculus student will study in depth the usual topics of first semester college calculus: limits, continuity, differentiation and its applications, integration and its applications including elementary functions, trigonometric functions, and transcendental functions.  Students will prepare for, and are required to take, the College Board Advanced Placement Examination. Another opportunity for college credit is available through the Saint Mary’s University PACC Program.Prerequisites: An average of B or better in Honors Precalculus and department approval. Summer work is required.
  • AP CALCULUS BC (2 semesters)This course continues the study of calculus.  Students will review the topics of AP Calculus AB and study in depth the usual topics of second semester college calculus:  parametric, polar and vector functions, graphs, limits, computation and application of derivatives, definite integration and its applications, antidifferentiation, polynomial functions and Taylor Series, and Maclaurin Series.  Students will prepare for, and are required to take, the College Board Advanced Placement Examination.Prerequisites:  An average of B or better in AP Calculus AB or an average of A in Calculus and departmental approval. Summer work is required.

The ability to function competently in at least one language other than English is essential in the interdependent world of the twenty-first century.  In addition to learning the structure and vocabulary of the target language, students will learn about daily life, social institutions, literature, art, and contemporary and historical issues. Placement of students with prior language experience will be determined on an individual basis.Beginning with the class of 2017, two years of a language are required for graduation. Three or four consecutive years of a single modern language are strongly recommended for students who plan to attend a four year college or university. Students are encouraged to continue to take language classes beyond the two-year requirement.

  • MANDARIN CHINESE I (2 semesters)Beginning Mandarin Chinese language students will be introduced to the building blocks of written and spoken Mandarin, elements of Chinese characters, a new pronunciation tool and the use of tones, in order to begin to use common expressions and be able to read and write basic characters.  In addition, students will hear and discuss idioms and compare Chinese and Western painting to reflect authentic Chinese values and perspectives.
  • MANDARIN CHINESE II (2 semesters)Mandarin Chinese II increases the use of classroom expressions learned in the first year and continues to increase new vocabulary and grammar patterns.  Course topics will include the life of Pearl Buck, acupuncture, Chinese tea etiquette and customs.
  • MANDARIN CHINESE III (2 semesters)Mandarin Chinese III increases the use of spoken Mandarin in class.  An advanced study of vocabulary, grammar and writing, drawing from college level material will be used to enhance fluency.  Students will develop character study through writing activities and essays.
  • SPANISH I -or- FRENCH I (2 semesters)In this course students will develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in the target language. Pronunciation, spelling, and basic sentence structure are stressed. Students are introduced to the culture and traditions of the countries of the target language.
  • SPANISH II -or- FRENCH II (2 semesters)In this course students will review the basic vocabulary and grammatical structures learned in the first year. The students will learn new grammatical structures, expand vocabulary, and improve communication skills.
  • SPANISH III (2 semesters)In this course students will review the basic vocabulary and grammatical structures learned in the previous year. New grammar structures and more advanced verb tenses are introduced to help students communicate at a higher level. Literature, art, and music will be interspersed at different points in the curriculum.Prerequisites:  A grade of C or better is required in the second year of the language and the instructor’s approval.
  • HONORS SPANISH III (2 semesters)Students will proceed at a more accelerated pace than in previous levels.  This accelerated pace will enable students to explore topics in greater detail. Students will have more opportunities for independent reading and writing in the language. The course will also provide practice on tasks that reflect the AP curriculum.Prerequisites:  A test average of 85% or better and the instructor’s approval are required in the second year of the language.
  • FRENCH III/IV (2 semesters)This course is designed to be a comprehensive in-depth review of listening, reading, writing and speaking skills in the target language. Students will increase their proficiency by reviewing grammar and reading abridged literary and historical selections in the target language. Students will improve their speaking and writing abilities by formulating and expressing their personal thoughts. Students will work individually and in groups to complete assignments and research projects.Prerequisites:  A grade of C or better and the instructor’s approval are required in the third year of the language.
  • HONORS SPANISH IV (2 semesters)This course provides extensive practice in all four language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) in the target language. Students will increase their proficiency through an in-depth review and expansion of grammar and vocabulary.  Students will develop proficiency and cultural understanding through careful reading and critical analysis of literature written in Spanish. Students will improve their speaking and writing abilities with opportunities for formulating and expressing their personal thoughts. Students will work individually and in groups to complete assignments and projects.Prerequisites:  A grade of C or better and the instructor’s approval are required in the third year of the language.
  • SPANISH COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION (2 semesters)In this course students will develop written and oral abilities and self-confidence in expressing ideas in Spanish.  The course will consist of intensive composition and communication practice in Spanish.  Students will explore themes such as social justice, love, life and death, immigration, human rights and the relationship between men and women, among others.  The goals are to expand grammar and vocabulary skills, to develop communicative and rhetorical skills, and to think critically about the themes of study.Prerequisites:  A grade of C or better in Spanish III and the instructor’s approval are required in the third year of the language.
  • AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (2 semesters)AP Spanish is the equivalent of a third-year college course in Advanced Spanish writing, reading, listening and speaking. The course draws on all of the students’ previous language learning and emphasizes the use of Spanish as a means for active communication. AP Spanish utilizes higher-level critical thinking skills and includes the refinement of grammatical accuracy and fluency. Course components include: reading and listening comprehension, the organization and writing of compositions, and spontaneous verbal conversation.  Students are required to take the AP Spanish Language and Culture Examination in May.Prerequisites:  A minimum grade of 90% and the instructor’s approval are required in Honors Spanish III. A minimum grade of 85% and the instructor’s approval are required in Honors Spanish IV and/or Spanish Composition and Communication.

The purpose of the Physical Education program is to develop an individual’s ability to constructively use capacities for movement as a way of expressing, exploring, and interpreting oneself and one’s relationship with the world. Students will develop skills and knowledge of how and why one moves effectively through games, sports, dance, and exercise.  The student will become knowledgeable about the history, rules, strategy, organization, equipment, and safety factors of the various activities.  The student should also acquire respect and appreciation for good physical conditioning and develop an interest and a desire to participate in lifetime recreational activities.Options are available for students to meet the credit requirements for Health and Physical Education: Wellness for Life.  Both Health and PE:Wellness for Life must be taken within 10th, 11th, or 12th grade.  Preference for enrollment will be given to 12th graders as these are required credits for graduation.Students will have the opportunity to take the required semester credit of Health in a traditional classroom setting or in a hybrid online/classroom setting.  The traditional Health or PE: Wellness for Life class will be offered either fall or spring semester. The Hybrid Health and the Hybrid PE: Wellness for Life courses each cover one semester of material over a full year and will be completed as an addition to seven other scheduled courses each semester.

  • PHYSICAL EDUCATION 9 (1 semester)This program is divided into two main areas: organized team activities and individual activities.  Activities include Archery, Soccer, Flag-Football, Basketball, Badminton, Weight-Training, Team Handball, Softball, Relaxation, Floor Hockey, Ultimate, Self-Defense, Dance, Recreational Sports and Volleyball.  Students are required to learn the physical skills, rules, safety practices, and strategy of the various activities.  All 9th graders are required to wear a standard uniform.This course is required of all 9th grade students: 
  • HEALTH (Traditional Option) (1 semester credit)Developing a healthy lifestyle enables students to maximize their physical, mental and social well-being. Individual diet programs are written, the symptoms and treatment of common diseases are reviewed, and the effects of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs are studied. Readings and discussions focus on improving stress management skills, intra-personal relations, attitudes, and habits.
  • -or students may choose-
  • HYBRID HEALTH (Online/Modified Class Time Option) (1 credit)This course will cover the same content as the traditional Health class but is modified in its combination of online work and face-to-face class instruction. Over the course of an entire school year, students will meet with the teacher once a week; the rest of the course work will be completed online during each week. During class sessions students will complete hands on activities, hold class discussions, and ask the instructor for understanding of concepts.  Online work includes watching lectures, completing assignments, responding to peers’ work, and discussions through a discussion board. Students must be able to attend all class meetings throughout the school year to receive credit.Students may choose to take “Hybrid Health – Zero Hour” or “Hybrid Health – Lunch Hour.”  “Zero Hour” students will meet once a week with their instructor, each Wednesday from 7:30-8:15am throughout the school year.  “Lunch Hour” students will meet once or twice a week with their instructor during their lunch hour.Students taking Hybrid Health need to be able to work independently, be self-motivated, have strong reading and writing skills and recognize the time commitment needed outside the classroom to be successful.
  • HYBRID WELLNESS (Online/Modified Class Time Option) )1 credit)This course will cover the same content as the traditional WELLNESS FOR LIFE class but is modified in its combination of online work and face-to-face class instruction. Over the course of an entire school year, students will meet with the teacher once a week; the rest of the course work will be completed online during each week. During class sessions students will complete hands on activities, hold class discussions, and ask the instructor for understanding of concepts.  Online work includes watching lectures, completing assignments, responding to peers’ work, and discussions through a discussion board. Students must be able to attend all class meetings throughout the school year to receive credit.Students may choose to take “Hybrid WELLNESS FOR LIFE – Zero Hour” or “Hybrid WELLNESS FOR LIFE – Lunch Hour.”  “Zero Hour” students will meet once a week with their instructor on a designated day from 7:30-8:15 am throughout the school year.  “Lunch Hour” students will meet once or twice a week with their instructor during their lunch hour.Students taking Hybrid WELLNESS FOR LIFE need to be able to work independently, be self-motivated, have strong reading and writing skills and recognize the time commitment needed outside the classroom to be successful.
  • PHYSICAL EDUCATION: WELLNESS FOR LIFE (1 credit)Students gain cognitive knowledge and skills of cardiovascular endurance, physical fitness and life time sports. There will be pre- and post-fitness assessments using electronic software to record gains made during the semester in both cardiovascular endurance and strength endurance. Each student will develop a fitness plan which will include goal setting, cardiovascular training, strength training, and evaluation of the fitness plan. There will be an emphasis on becoming a wise consumer of health and fitness services and products such as medical insurance, fitness clubs, exercise products, and sports equipment.-or students may choose to fulfill the requirement by requesting a waiver for Wellness for Life –Students who have completed one full season of participation on a DeLaSalle athletic team, beginning with the fall season of 10th grade through winter season of 12th grade, may apply for a waiver of the PE: Wellness credit through the Student Activities Office.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ELECTIVES

  • TEAM SPORTS (1 semester)Through a wide variety of team and individual activities, the students will develop a sense of responsibility for themselves and others.  Being a contributing member of a group and/or team in a variety of leadership roles will give the student an opportunity to learn techniques to lead effectively and to positively influence the behavior of others.This course is available for 11th and 12th graders.
  • FIRST AID CPR-AED/ATHLETIC TRAINING (1 semester)This course is divided into two major sections. The first half of the course will involve instruction in the basic first aid techniques and performance of cardio-pulminary resuscitation & AED. Upon successful completion of this section, students will be certified in adult, infant and child CPR and community first aid. During the second half of the course, students will focus on the role of the athletic trainer in the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries, including an introduction to basic anatomy, concentrating on the limbs, back and cardiovascular systems. Preventative taping techniques are also taught.This course is available for 11th and 12th graders.
  • SHAPE UP FITNESS (1 semester)This course will concentrate on different fitness routines to increase physical fitness for a lifetime. Students will learn about and participate in a variety of fitness routines. Students will create a fitness plan. Activities will include Pilates, Yoga, Tae-Bo, weight training, power walking, circuit training, cardiovascular training, muscle toning, agility training, and stretches to increase flexibility.This course is available for 11th and 12th graders.

The Science program offers the student the opportunity to explore the natural world and discover the principles that govern natural processes, both living and nonliving.  The focus of the curriculum is on critical thinking and problem solving skills that are developed through laboratory and other investigative activities.  In addition, the student will also demonstrate mastery of appropriate scientific literacy, mathematical modeling, and develop skills in cooperation and communication in the practice of scientific inquiry.It is recommended that students take four years of Science as many colleges will require three to four years of Science for admission. Completion of Chemistry and upper-level Physics are strongly recommended if the students plans to follow a college program in the physical sciences, life sciences, computer science, mathematics, engineering, psychology, or physical education.

  • FUNDAMENTALS OF PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY (2 semesters)This ninth grade science class introduces physics topics (force, motion, electricity, magnetism, waves, nuclear physics) and chemistry topics (atomic models, the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical reactions) with an algebra basis.  Throughout the course, students practice precise laboratory measurements and techniques.This course is required of all 9th grade students.
  • BIOLOGY (2 semesters)The biology class explores the origins and history of life, the structures of living things (biochemistry), how living things function (cellular processes), and how living things interact with one another (ecological relationships).  Throughout the course, students will develop laboratory skills with focus on observation, modeling and field studies.This course is required of all 10th grade students. 
  • CHEMISTRY (2 semesters)Chemistry is a laboratory-based science course.  Students develop their critical thinking and qualitative problem-solving skills in a collaborative environment including modeling,  graphing, and experimental investigations.  Topics include atomic structure, physical states of matter, organic chemistry, the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical equations, properties of gases, reactions, solutions, acids and bases.This course is required of all 11th grade students.Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra I

SCIENCE ELECTIVES

  • HONORS CHEMISTRY (2 semesters)Honors Chemistry will stress topics related to matter and energy, scientific measurement, atomic structure, chemical names and formulas, problem solving, stoichiometry, states of matter, electron configurations, chemical periodicity, and other appropriate topics.  The student will be made aware of how chemical processes and principles are related to everyday experiences.  Students will be encouraged to assume more responsibility for their own learning by making experimentation and problem solving skills an integral part of the topics covered.This course fulfills the 11th grade Science requirement.Prerequisites: Completion of — or concurrent enrollment in — Algebra II and department approval.
  • AP CHEMISTRY (2 semesters)This course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first year of college. Students will attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a competence in dealing with chemical problems. The course will contribute to the development of the students’ abilities to think clearly and to express their ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and logic. Topics of study will include structure of matter, states of matter, reactions, descriptive chemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, and chemical calculations. In this rigorous course, independent work is required and a significant amount of out-of-class reading and study time is expected. Students enrolled in AP Chemistry will prepare for the AP exam in May.Prerequisites: Successful completion of Honors Chemistry and Algebra II and department approval.
  • PHYSICS (2 semesters)This course is recommended for most twelfth graders planning on going to college; it is necessary for those who will be majoring in a technical discipline: mathematics, science, or engineering. Physics is a heavily math-dependent subject that studies the world around us.  Students will study topics including motion in one and two dimensions, force, friction and Newton’s laws, work and energy, momentum and collisions, vibrations and waves, sound, light and reflection. Throughout the course, students will develop measuring and analytical modeling skills.Prerequisites: Successful completion of both Chemistry and Algebra II with department approval.
  • AP PHYSICS (2 semesters)This course is equivalent to the general physics course usually taken during the first year of college.  Students will attain a depth of understanding fundamentals of physics and a competence in dealing with physical science problems.  The course will contribute to the development of the students’ abilities to think clearly and to express their ideas orally and in writing, with clarity and logic.   Topics of study will include Newtonian mechanics (motion in one and two dimensions, force, rotational motion, and angular momentum), work, energy, power, mechanical waves, sound, and an introduction to electrical circuits.  In this heavily math-dependent, rigorous course, independent work is required and significant amount of out-of-class reading and study time is expected.  Students will prepare for the AP Physics Exam.Prerequisites:  Successful completion of Honors Chemistry, enrollment in Precalculus or Calculus, and department approval.
  • AP BIOLOGY (2 semesters)AP Biology is a rigorous course designed for the college bound student who is considering a major in science or medicine and who has a profound interest in the Biological Sciences.  The course will help students develop advanced inquiry and reasoning skills such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines and connecting concepts in and across domains.  The result will be readiness for the study of advanced topics in subsequent college courses and to prepare students to take the AP Biology test for possible college credit.Open to 11th and 12th grade students.Prerequisites:  Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry (Honors Chemistry preferred) and departmental approval.
  • ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (1 semester)Environmental Science will examine questions relating to use of land, water, air, and energy.  This course will include field studies, economic theory, and ethical thinking.  Students will participate in simulations, analyze data from charts, graphs, and satellite images, and use online resources for discussion and debate.Open to 11th and 12th grade students.
  • PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING (1 semester)This course exposes students to major concepts they will encounter in a post-secondary engineering course of study.  Topics include mechanisms, energy, statics, materials science and kinematics. Students will develop problem solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work and communicate solutions.Open to 11th and 12th grade students.Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry and/or departmental approval.  It is recommended that the student be enrolled in Physics.

The goals of the DeLaSalle Social Studies department are to mold students to possess the requisite skills to become informed, effective and involved members of their communities; students who have developed the research skills and content mastery needed to succeed in college; and students with an awareness and understanding of the diverse complexity that comprises our world.  The core curriculum is three and one-half years of history, social science, geography and government.

  • WORLD HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY (1 semester)This one semester class is a key component of the DeLaSalle Social Studies curriculum as it prepares an academic foundation for the department. The class begins with an overview of local and DeLaSalle history. Students will study selected areas within the Mediterranean region, Africa, India, China and Europe so as to examine the development of city-states, kingdoms and empires. Each unit of study will include map work and a project that could include written work, a work of art, or another creative assignment. The class will include role-playing, group work and short in-class student created presentations.This course is required of all 9th grade students:
  • MODERN WORLD HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY 2 semestersThis course will concentrate on the history, geography and geographical implications of modern politics and international relationships. During the first semester, the emphasis will be on Europe and Africa with the second emphasizing Asia and the Americas. Throughout the course there is an analysis of social, economic and cultural issues in the world through the lens of the five themes of geography: location, place, human-environment interaction, movement and region.This course is required of all 10th grade students:
  • U.S. HISTORY (2 semesters)This survey course of US history will examine the significant political, social and economic events, movements and interactions that shaped the United States. Though the focus of the course will be the 20th century special attention is paid to the foundational components of the 2oth century, including: US Revolution, Market Revolution, Sectionalism, Civil War, Reconstruction, Industrialization. In addition, each student will create a History Day project that will require students to gather, organize, and evaluate primary and secondary historical sources.This course is required of all 11th grade students:
  • UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT (1 semester)This one semester course will examine the history, workings, and intricacies of the U.S. government.  The concepts, structures, and operations that will be examined include: the U.S. Constitution, separation of powers, significant U.S. Supreme Court cases, divisions between federal and state governments, political parties, civil and political rights, and the distinctions between the three branches of government.  Emphasis will be placed on a practical understanding of how the government works and its effects on the citizenry.This course is required of all 12th grade students:

SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

  • AP UNITED STATES HISTORY (2 semesters)This is an in-depth and detailed look at U.S. history from European exploration and colonization to the present. Students will read a college or AP text that will be supplemented by primary sources, selected readings, and specialized writings. Students will demonstrate an ability to acquire and amass factual knowledge while critically analyzing various themes and interpretations within the study of U.S. history through essays, exams, and projects. Like students in U.S. History class, the students will create a History Day project. In the spring students will have the opportunity to earn college credit upon successfully completing the AP U.S. History exam.Open to 11th grade students. This course fulfills the 11th grade Social Studies requirement.Prerequisites:  A teacher recommendation that includes test scores, work ethic, consistency of performance and intellectual curiosity. Summer work is required.
  • AP U.S. GOVERNMENT (1 semester)AP U.S. Government provides an in-depth and detailed look at the workings of the U.S. Government.  This course goes into greater detail of the concepts and material taught in the College Preparatory course. The class is designed to afford students the  opportunity to earn college credit. Students who take this course will be prepared to take the AP U. S. Government test offered in May.Open to 12th grade students.  This course fulfills the 12th grade U.S. Government requirementPrerequisites:  Departmental approval. 
  • AP EUROPEAN HISTORY (2 semesters)This is an in-depth study of European History from the Middle Ages to the present time.  The goal is to prepare students to take and pass the AP Test in May.  Students will be using an AP or college textbook and will have related readings. They will be expected to be able to participate in class discussions and write essays that will analyze and evaluate historical events.  There will also be project work.Open to 12th grade students.Prerequisites:  A teacher recommendation that includes test scores, work ethic, consistency of performance and intellectual curiosity. Summer work is required.
  • ANTHROPOLOGY (1 semester)This course is designed to give the students a comprehensive understanding of humanity by introducing them to the four sub fields of anthropology: physical anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and cultural anthropology.  Students will participate in challenging and thought-provoking activities including discussions, observations, critical thinking, hands-on analysis, projects and fieldwork.  Throughout this course students are expected to put their knowledge into practice.  They will use their new anthropological skills to observe a culture and present the information they have found in a descriptive report, ethnography.Open to 11th and 12th grade students.
  • ECONOMICS (1 semester)Covering basic micro and macroeconomic concepts the students will learn about how people organize for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.  The goal is to increase the students’ awareness about how economic issues significantly affect the quality of their lives.  Students will participate in a variety of learning experiences that will determine how local, state, national, and global economies can be independent.  Specific lessons will focus on personal finance, oil cartels, running a business, the Federal Reserve Bank, gambling’s impact on Minnesota and the global seafood market.Open to 11th and 12th grade students.
  • PSYCHOLOGY (1 semester)This course provides a basic introduction to the science of Psychology and covers the following topics: the biology of behavior with a focus on the brain; the role of heredity and environment in shaping such behaviors as intelligence and personality; consciousness and altered states of consciousness; the learning theories of Pavlov, Skinner, and various cognitive theorists; personality theories and their measurement; and abnormal psychology.Open to 11th and 12th grade students.
  • STREET LAW (1 semester)Street Law is designed to expose students to the law, legal system, and criminology. Units include: What is law? How are laws made? What causes crime? How do we catch criminals? What do we do with criminals? Emphasis is placed on criminal law as it applies to the student. Topics include forensics, the death penalty, racial profiling, mandatory minimum sentences, lobbying, and the environment, and mental health as it relates to crime. Speakers include judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, and law enforcement personnel.Open to 10th, 11th and 12th grade students.
  • PERSONAL FINANCE (1 semester)This course is design to help students become responsible stewards of their resources while developing and maintaining sound financial habits.  Some of the topics to be addressed in the course include: making and keeping a budget, managing loans, paying taxes and filing an income tax return, investing for retirement (IRA, 401k, or 403b), purchasing insurance products. Students will be engaged in a variety of projects to develop the critical knowledge to discern what to do before and after payday to be a financially responsible citizen.Open to 11th and 12th grade students

In harmony with the philosophy of DeLaSalle High School and the National Catechetical Directory: Sharing the Light of Faith, the Theology Department attempts to do the following for our students:

  • To encourage each one to develop a personal faith response to the unconditional love of God,
  • To provide them with an understanding of the Catholic tradition,
  • To help them to learn how to participate in a community of faith,
  • To invite each to live a life of service to others.

The Bible, the Word of God, is shared daily through classroom prayers, texts, activities and liturgies.  Opportunities for participation in the sacramental life of the Catholic Church are made available in cooperation with Lasallian Ministry.Through the study of Jesus’ life and mission, students encounter Christian values basic to life in all of its progressions and challenges.  Students develop an awareness of the created world as a gift, but also recognize the need for redemption.  Theology teachers seek to aid students in their search for God through the examination of world history, cultures and customs. Emphasis is given to the Catholic Tradition, its historical development and ritual expression.These studies are positioned against the backdrop of contemporary times in order to furnish the values necessary for attaining a productive and fulfilled Catholic life.

  • CHRISTIAN SERVICEChristian Service is an opportunity to practice and share faith beliefs and values in the greater community.  By volunteering at local service agencies, students gain insights and understanding of the economic, physical, and spiritual needs of community members.  It is hoped that students will develop a life-long desire to meet these needs and continue to work for solutions to unjust situations.  All students, including those that transfer to DeLaSalle High School, must perform a minimum of sixty (60) hours of Christian Service as a graduation requirement.  Hours will be recorded and monitored on a regular basis through Christian Service Validation Forms.  All hours and a reflection paper must be submitted by the end of the first semester of the 12th grade year.  Upon completion students will receive a grade of “P” (passing) and 1 credit.
  • SACRED SCRIPTURE (2 semesters)Students will be introduced to the study of Scripture using the historical critical method.  They will learn the relationship between Scripture and tradition, understand the religious truth behind the biblical accounts, and make connections to their lives.  Students will study both the Old and New Testaments.This course is required of all 9th grade students
  • THE CREED AND THE SACRAMENTS (2 semesters)In the first semester students will study the creed as a source of understanding the major historical events from the time of the Apostles to the second Vatican Council.  During the second semester students will explore Liturgy, Sacraments, and the Paschal Mystery as they relate to the life, passion, death and resurrection of Jesus.This course is required of all 10th grade students.
  • FAITH AND SOCIETY (1 semester)This course is designed to help a student acknowledge and embrace the rights and responsibilities each has to the global world as a Christian – living with others.  Each student will explore the social justice principles and how to advocate for the marginalized, understand the value of ethics in the work place, civic community, national and global environments, and gain an appreciation for others with different religious traditions as it relates to bringing about living peacefully together.This course will be required of all 11th and 12th grade students for the 2015– 2016 school year.

11th and 12th grade students must choose one of the following theology electives for the 2015-2016 school year.

  • CHRISTIANITY IN AMERICA (1 semester)The students will review the characters and events in history that influenced the development of the Christian church and its theology in North and South America.  This course will examine numerous topics including missions, settlements, indigenous religions and the relationship between the church and state.
  • COMPARATIVE RELIGIONS (1 semester)This course deals initially with the major questions confronting humankind: the nature of God, mystery, human destiny and purpose.  Major world religions will be surveyed: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity.  In each case, this survey will provide a treatment of basic underlying philosophical assumptions about life and about the basic beliefs of each religion.
  • FAITH AND MORALITY (1 semester)This course is designed to help a student choose to live a Christian life by conscientiously determining his/her morals; exploring Christian lifestyles, learning and practicing many activities (prayer, meditation, and devotion) to enhance their relationship to God and recognizing the importance of dying with dignity as part of a Christian life.  This course will give a student the opportunity to continue to develop his/her spiritual life and recognize the process as a lifelong value.This course will be required of all 11th and 12th grade students for the 2016-2017 school year.

11th and 12th grade students will be required to choose one of the three theology electives for the 2016-2017 school year.

  • THEOLOGY IN THE ARTS (1 semester)This course examines the theological expressions in the arts.  Students will compare and contrast various religious themes in different cultures and historical periods.  We will examine the role of the church in the development of painting, sculpture, music and drama.  The student will learn an appreciation of classic works and their spiritual meaning.
  • INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (1 semester)This course is a thematic introduction to the study of philosophy, the love of wisdom. The students will examine several classic philosophic problems such as the character of moral responsibility, free will vs. determinism, existence of God, nature of knowledge, relationship between mind and body, and organization of society.